Compression Guides Compression Guide

Compression Guide

compression

This Compression guide is help you understand the Daylong compression levels and how they translate to other compression levels around the world and the associated products and conditions.

Daylong Classifications

Different manufacturers of compression hosiery work to different specifications. This can be either UK or EU (in Europe some products are called RAL) – which can be confusing.
To help you avoid this confusion we here at Daylong have created our own compression classification. Our chart below, that will help you find where the different standards fit in with your own chart.

Pressure Conversions

Different manufacturers of compression hosiery work to different specifications. This can be either UK or EU (in Europe some products are called RAL) – which can be confusing.

Pressure Conversion
Daylong EU/RAL UK US
Standard Range Standard Range Standard Range

Extra Light

Light
UK Class 1 14-17 mmHg

Moderate
EU Class 1 18-21 mmHg UK Class 2 18-24 mmHg US Class 1 15-20 mmHg
Firm
EU Class 2 23-32 mmHg UK Class 3 25-35 mmHg US Class 2 20-30 mmHg
Extra Firm
EU Class 3 34-46 mmHg US Class 3 30-40 mmHg

Contraindications

Compression hosiery is not recommended in the following circumstances:

  • Ischaemia (lack of oxygen) in the limbs due to peripheral arterial disease, particularly affecting the legs. This causes pain on walking, known as intermittent claudication. It arises because the arteries supplying the legs have become narrowed or blocked, and the muscles cannot get enough oxygen.
  • Peripheral neuropathy: damage to the nerves in the hands, arms, feet and legs.
  • Congestive heart failure: this arises when the heart muscle becomes weak or stiff and cannot pump blood around the body efficiently. It causes a buildup of fluid – oedema in the legs.
  • Diabetes: peripheral arterial disease and peripheral neuropathy are both complications of diabetes. Anyone with other conditions that would normally require treatment with compression hosiery need to be carefully assessed and monitored if the medical team decides that the benefits of compression will outweigh the risks.
  • Cellulitis: an infection deep within the skin that causes fluid build up – oedema.
  • An allergy to components used to make compression garments. Skin reactions do occur – sometimes these can be solved by using a different brand or type, but if you are allergic to compression garments, wearing them will put you at risk of skin breaks and infection.
  • You should always consult your doctor or medical professional before wearing compression hosiery. They will assist you with selecting the appropriate level of compression for your condition.

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